Photograph of potatoes growing under row cover
image

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

              

              CONTROL YOUR SEASONS

           AND GROWING CONDITIONS


Control Your Conditions
Dry - Warm - Cool - Pest-free - Productive - Practical ... All Are Possible

image: savoy cabbage INSECT BARRIERS & POLLINATION

Summer-weight insect barrier fabric can prevent or greatly reduce damage done to plants by pesky beetles and hungry, hungry larvae. But pollinators are often insects, too. How, then, does one manage?

PEST-FREE, BUT WHAT ABOUT THE POLLINATORS?

The use of insect barrier row covers was explored on the previous page: Keeping It Pest-Free. But there's more to be said. Some plants don't require pollination to produce the desired crop - leafy or root vegetables and even some fruiting plants like tomatoes, eggplant and peppers. But those grown for their developing or ripened fruit certainly do. How does one best use row cover for plants under attack but requiring wind or insect pollination?

Summer Squash is a good example. In our area of the country, cucumber beetles are serious pests. We still have plenty of bees, but sometimes I do declare that cucumber beetles are our best pollinator. They're everywhere!

*** Are you combatting squash vine borers? They're a different issue altogether and a real pain! But there is a solution. New pages concerning pest protection are underway. Come back soon for tips and tricks. ***

I cover my squash on the day of seeding and keep it covered until the first bloom opens. Monitor closely, though. Sometimes the first blooms are all female, and with no male blooms open, the baby fruits will wither. Very soon, though, the boys come into town. Uncover, and a couple hours later, you're stealth-delivering zucchini to your neighbors in the dark of night.

a raised bed, cabbages and broccoli growing under row cover Cone-shaped Caraflex cabbages, broccoli, and Minuet mini-Nappa cabbage growing under cover.

Sometimes the moths win and sneak in anyway. Check regularly for the white cabbage moth flitting about inside (Lift the covers on one side or one end and let them out.) Inspect the centers of the plants for larvae. The height of the raised bed makes monitoring easier.

SOME PLANTS REQUIRE INSECT OR WIND POLLINATION - REMOVE COVERS AT BLOOM TIME

Cucumbers
Squash, Summer and Winter
Melons

SOME PLANTS DO NOT REQUIRE POLLINATORS TO PRODUCE THE EDIBLE CROP AND CAN REMAIN COVERED UNTIL HARVEST

Grown for their leaves or roots:
Lettuces
Spinach
Cabbages
Broccoli
Beets
Carrots
Radishes
Potatoes

Self-Pollinators (no help needed)
Beans (I love a frustrated bean beetle!)
Peas
Tomatoes
Eggplant (Hahaha, flea beetles!)
Some new varieties of cucumbers

A raised bed and a hoop, with row cover draped over two eggplant plants

Two eggplants at the end of the pepper bed, under insect barrier row cover. The peppers never attract pests, but the eggplant are flea beetle magnets!

We use Agribon AG-15, available from Johnny's Seeds (250' roll) and from and from Amazon in 50' and 250' rolls



More...NEXT: KEEPING IT PRODUCTIVE

previous page arrow Previous Page



Site Map | Contact Us